THE VALLEY OF HEARTS DELIGHT
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PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA

VERNA JEAN  SCHOOL
San Francisco and Palo Alto, California
1927-1968
 


photo by Peter Vogt- 1949 Verna Jean School, Palo Alto , California

SEE THE RECENTLY PUBLISHED HISTORY OF VERNA JEAN SCHOOL 
begins on page 2 of the Barron Park Association Newsletter - Winter 2010
click here: http://www.bpaonline.org/bp-news/pdfs/2010-winter/Winter10.pdf



SHARE YOUR MEMORIES
 Let's build this website with your photos & memories

  My name was Carolyn Vogt when I was a student at Verna Jean School in Palo Alto.
I would love to hear from you if you have memories and or photos to share.

 (put the words "Verna Jean" in the subject line)



The school first began in San Francisco and later moved to Palo Alto, in the Barron Park Neighborhood
in 1945.  This land was once part of the Barron Estate.
The owner, Ella Shaffer,  was called "Auntie" by the students.  Miss Nettie Mills taught in the one room school.
Mrs. Roberts was the cook. 
The school was named after  Auntie's two daughters, Verna and Jean.
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A pamphlet, The Tall Tree, Vol. 1 No.4, published by the Palo Alto Historical Society , 1957,  includes this description:

VERNA JEAN DAY AND BOARDING SCHOOL
 Mrs. Ella Shaffer's Verna Jean Day and Boarding School came here in 1945 from San Francisco and has
  remained. In the spring of 1927 Mrs. Shaffer opened her school at 2357 Chestnut Street, San Francisco, and
in 1934 bought some of the old Barron estate property at 3898 Magnolia Drive for boarding-school purposes.
 The school now embraces nearly six acres and has two buildings for its 60 boarders and 20 day students.
  Mrs. Shaffer, as managing owner, is assisted by her two daughters, for whom the school is named.
  The staff of four teachers and housemother gives tutelage to boys and girls from kindergarten
through the eighth grade.  A summertime day camp is also operated on the grounds.
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 "Founded and organized by Ella Shaffer, the Verna Jean
Kindergarten and primary school in San Francisco has been in existence for
three years and was first located on Avilla street. It soon outgrew the
original quarters and a substantial brick building of fireproof construction
was erected at 2357 Chestnut street, in the heart of the Marina district.
The three floors of the building are used for the school and this beautiful
structure is being enlarged by the addition of a dormitory. The school
takes the children up to and through the third grade. There are large
indoor playrooms, as well as large outdoor yards, where the children enjoy
supervised play. Hot, dietary lunches are served and regular dental and
medical service is maintained - unusual features in schools of this type.
Connected with the school from June 15 to August 15, during the period of
vacation, is the summer school, ideally situated on the campus of Stanford
University in Palo Alto, which enjoys a salubrious and delightful climate.
Well known in her profession, Miss Shaffer is widely recognized as an
authority on matters relative to the education of children and has made the
Verna Jean Kindergarten and primary school one of the finest institutions
of the kind in San Francisco."

The reference is found on pages 97-98
 "The History of San Francisco, Biographical, Vol. II" ;Lewis
 Francis Byington, Supervising Editor, Oscar Lewis, Associate Editor,
The S. J. Clarke  Publishing Company, Chicago-San Francisco, 1931.

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 SCHOOL CHILDREN MOVE INTO PHI KAP HOUSE; CLAMOR FOR SECONDS AND UPPER BERTHS
By Eleanor Furst

27 June 1933 
It's vacation time for the children of Verna Jean school ,a private institution in San Francisco for children between the ages of seven and  twelve,

and for the third successive year twenty-five youngsters have moved  into the Phi Kappa Sigma house on Alvarado street.

Scooters and jump ropes have taken the place of baseball and football on the Phi Kap front lawn, while inside picture puzzles and building blocks are strewn

in place of textbooks on the ; study table. Except for their ages, these youngsters are not so different, however, from the regular occupants of the house,

for the nurses tell us it's almost impossible to keep enough bread I and butter and refills on the table, while the usual amount of scrapping

goes on over who gets the upper bunk. Sheila, a bright-eyed lass of six, interrupts the task of seating her black and white terrier

in Jimmy's cart —because he's sick and the ambulance is | going to take him to the hospital over there on the woodpile—long enough

to say that she likes it down here better than in the city because there's no school and lots of nice things to do, such as marshmallow toasts

around the fire, games, and swimming. Twenty  more children will join the group already here when school lets out for everybody on July 1. 

The Stanford Daily, Volume 83 iSSUE 2, 27 jUNE 1933


SEE PALO ALTO HISTORY and GENEALOGY

SEE SANTA CLARA COUNTY HISTORY AND GENEALOGY




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July 2015